(From STC #25 “Wonder Boy in Ghost World Part 4” - Script by Mark Eyles, Art by Bojan Djukac, Lettering by Steve Potter)
Trying to decide which of the following is more appropriate as music for this cliffhanger.  Choose yourself from the following selection:
OPTION A
OPTION B

(From STC #25 “Wonder Boy in Ghost World Part 4” - Script by Mark Eyles, Art by Bojan Djukac, Lettering by Steve Potter)

Trying to decide which of the following is more appropriate as music for this cliffhanger.  Choose yourself from the following selection:

OPTION A

OPTION B

And while we’re at it…

Here’s a bonus Golden Axe picture that’s really awkward.

(From STC #5: “Citadel of Dead Souls Part 5” - Script by Mark Eyles, Art by Mike White, Lettering by Tom Frame)

While I appreciate the late Mike White’s attempt to recreate the odd jump animation of the original video game (seriously, this whole fight sequence is basically nothing but that), the fact remains this looks extremely weird (not to mention surprisingly undynamic for a BIG ATTACK!).

Also, BIG ATTACK!?

Okay, look…

When it comes to the events of a novel, it’s generally the case that things will be written in the past tense.  “He told me not to do that”, “Mark opened the box”, “Cindy danced into the early hours”, crap like that, right?  In a comic book, if you use caption boxes, it’s almost always present tense unless it’s a flashback.  That’s not to say you can’t tell a comic book story as if it’s something that already happened, though that generally assumes the caption boxes serve as a narrator.

Either way, consistency is nice.

(From STC #2: “Citadel of Dead Souls Part 2” - Script by Mark Eyles, Art by Mike White, Lettering by Richard Bird)

As you can see here, the introductory caption box, while recapping previous events, frames what we are looking at as “now”.

(From STC #5: “Citadel of Dead Souls Part 5” - Script by Mark Eyles, Art by Mike White, Lettering by Tom Frame)

And then this happens and it’s incredibly jarring.  Fair enough, maybe the letterer made a mistake…

(From STC #6: “Citadel of Dead Souls Part 6” - Script by Mark Eyles, Art by Mike White, Lettering by Tom Frame)

Except Tom Frame was a legendary letterer who didn’t make mistakes.  It’s a letterer’s job to write out what the script says, no matter how weird.  This tense-shift was obviously in the script on more than one occassion.

I’m not saying it subtracts from the story at all (Citadel of Dead Souls is a fairly unremarkable story on its own merits, though its art is undeniably wonderful) but it takes the reader out of the moment.  Call it nitpicking if you will, but sometimes these details make all the difference.

Here’s one I’ve been wanting to do

This post concerns some of my favourite characters from STC’s early days, Cam ‘n’ Bert, Search ‘n’ Repair Operatives in the unfortunately named Badnik Army Repair Functionaries (B.A.R.F.).  Yes, their name is a pun on camembert cheese.  No, I did not get that as a child.  Yes, it is hilarious.

Basically, their job is to find smashed Badniks Sonic and his friends have destroyed and fix them so they’re good to go again.  They were the first original characters to get a story in the Sonic’s World strip which, much like Archie Comics’ Sonic Universe, was used to flesh out the world of the comic by focusing on characters other than Sonic himself, eventually becoming Amy & Tekno’s strip.

(From STC #33: “No More Mr. Nice Bug Part 2” - Script by Mark Eyles, Pencils by Mike Hadley, Colours by John M. Burns, Lettering by Elitta Fell)

Cam is a cat and Bert is a bull.  Cam’s smart and devious, Bert prefers to just hammer the shit out of things because why not?  Together they make an excellent team and are apparently trusted operatives of Robotnik, as seen here:

(From STC #59: “The Seven Badniks Part 1” - Script by Mark Eyles, Pencils by Mike Hadley, Colours by John M. Burns, Lettering by Tom Frame)

The two of them are on quite familiar- indeed, friendly- terms with their glorious leader Doctor Robotnik.  Their second story concluded in an open-ended manner that was sadly never resolved.  But that’s not why we’re here.

Notice anything different between the two panels above?  Well, in spite of the artists being the same, Cam is noticeably different.  Her eyes are less sinister and her teeth are less POINTY AND SHARP AND TERRIFYING.  In general she is more feminine and feline in design.

I have nothing to prove such a hypothesis but my theory is that the change is a result of STC getting letters from children saying they were having night terrors because of Cam’s scary Goddamn face and could they please never do that again.  Like I said, I can’t prove that, but I think I’m going to get night terrors from that face.

(From STC #31: “The Morbidden Hunt Part 4” - Script by Mark Eyles, Pencils by Casanovas, Colours by John M. Burns, Lettering by Elitta Fell)
"But I can… ISN’T THAT RIGHT, READERS?!"

(From STC #31: “The Morbidden Hunt Part 4” - Script by Mark Eyles, Pencils by Casanovas, Colours by John M. Burns, Lettering by Elitta Fell)

"But I can… ISN’T THAT RIGHT, READERS?!"